Get the Care



So you have health insurance – now what? Click here for help on taking the first steps to make the most of your coverage:

1. Confirm your coverage
2. Find a provider
3. Make an appointment

Know Your Services


Each of the below preventive services is covered by insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act and available to you at no additional costs.

Well-Woman Visits

Who are they for?
Women of all ages

What do they mean for me?
All women, no matter what age or health condition, need to schedule a well-woman visit at least once a year. At this visit, your provider gives you a physical exam and checks your overall health. You can talk to your health care provider about any health concerns you have, and your provider can tell you about preventive services you may need to help you stay healthy.

Contraception, Counseling and Follow-up Care

Who is it for?
Adolescent and adult women

What does it mean for me?
There are many different forms of birth control, so it’s important to talk to your health care provider about your options. Learn about the different birth control methods and decide which one is best for you here and in conversations with your health care provider. All FDA-approved methods of birth control for women are covered under the Affordable Care Act. (FDA Chart) (En español)

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) Counseling

Who is it for?
Sexually active adolescent and adult women at increased risk for STIs

What does it mean for me?
STIs are infections you can get from having sex with an infected person. They can cause serious health problems. Talk to your health care provider about how to prevent sexually transmitted infections and reduce your risk. Counseling is available for the prevention and treatment of STIs to help you stay safe and healthy.

Cervical Cancer Screening

Who is it for?
Starting at age 21 for women at average risk

What does it mean for me?
Cervical cancer is cancer of the cervix (the part of the uterus that opens into the vagina). If found early, it’s treatable. Regular Papanicolaou tests, also known as Pap tests or Pap smears, and the human papillomavirus (HPV) test are used for early detection of cervical cancer. If you are between the ages of 21 to 29 years, you should receive a Pap test every 3 years. If you are between 30 and 65 years, you should receive a Pap test and an HPV test every 5 years or be screened with a Pap test every 3 years. Early detection increases treatment success rates and saves lives.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Screening

Who is it for?
Adolescent and adult women throughout their lifespan

What does it mean for me?
HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. Screening is essential to HIV prevention, treatment, and care. You should be screened at least once in your lifetime, or more often if you are at increased risk for HIV, as well as if you become pregnant.

Breast Cancer Screening

Who is it for?
Average-risk women starting at age 40

What does it mean for me?
If you are of average risk of breast cancer, you should get a mammogram at least every 2 years starting no earlier than age 40, but no later than age 50, through at least age 74. If you are at a higher-risk of developing breast cancer, you should talk to your health care provider about when to initiate screening and how often. It is important to talk with your health care provider about your risk for breast cancer and the best screening plan for you.

Interpersonal and Domestic Violence Screening

Who is it for?
Adolescent and adult women throughout their life

What does it mean for me?
Screening for women in violent situations is available. Your health care provider’s office is a safe place to talk and get connected to services and support.

Gestational Diabetes Screening

Who is it for?
Pregnant women between 24-28 weeks of gestation

What does it mean for me?
If you are pregnant, you should have a screening test to check your blood sugar levels. Testing for gestational diabetes is important to protect yourself and improve birth outcomes.

Breastfeeding Services and Supplies

Who is it for?
Women before, during, and after pregnancy

What does it mean for me?
The counseling, education, breast pump, and supplies you may need for successful breastfeeding are available at no out-of-pocket costs to you.

Urinary Incontinence Screening
*NEW*

Who is it for?
Adult women throughout their life

What does it mean for me?
Talk to your doctor annually if urinary incontinence is impacting your activities and quality of life.

Diabetes Mellitus after Pregnancy
*NEW*

Who is it for?
Women after pregnancy

What does it mean for me?
If you have a history of gestational diabetes, you should be screened for Type 2 Diabetes within your first year postpartum and at least every 3 years for 10 years after pregnancy.